Northlands Centre reports drastic fall in attendances due to Covid

Tue, 10/11/2020 - 10:22 -- Editor

The Northlands Addiction Treatment Centre has reported a fall of almost 60 per cent in the number of people able to access its residential programme, due to the impact of the pandemic. 

 in Derry anticipates that 24 men and women will have gone through its programme by the end of this year, compared to 57 in 2019. When the Centre reopened in June, after the first COVID lockdown, its residential capacity had to be reduced from eight beds to four. 

Head of Treatment, Tommy Canning, says that Northlands has succeeded in keeping its non-residential counselling and support services going but the restrictions on residential capacity will affect around thirty people. ‘These are men and women who’ve made the difficult decision of admitting that they’re struggling with addiction, and who’d have been willing to undergo a residential treatment programme,’ Mr Canning said. 

‘We’ve heard recently how services for some life-threatening illnesses like cancer have been badly affected by the pandemic. It's important to keep in mind that addiction is also a life-threatening illness, and that it can have a devastating impact on individuals, families and the community.’  

Mr Canning says that while there’s hope of a vaccine being found for COVID, there’s no vaccine for addiction. ‘The New Decade, New Approach programme for government contains a commitment to a new addiction centre in Derry. Now, more than ever, it’s crucial that this is delivered.’ 

He says that in the meantime, anyone who is concerned about their own addiction problem, or someone else’s, should call Northlands on 02871 313232.

One of Northern Ireland’s leading addiction treatment centres has reported a fall of almost 60 per cent in the number of people able to access its residential programme, due to the impact of the pandemic.

 

Northlands Addiction Treatment Centre in Derry anticipates that 24 men and women will have gone through its programme by the end of this year, compared to 57 in 2019. When the Centre reopened in June, after the first COVID lockdown, its residential capacity had to be reduced from eight beds to four.

 

Head of Treatment, Tommy Canning, says that Northlands has succeeded in keeping its non-residential counselling and support services going but the restrictions on residential capacity will affect around thirty people. ‘These are men and women who’ve made the difficult decision of admitting that they’re struggling with addiction, and who’d have been willing to undergo a residential treatment programme,’ Mr Canning said.

 

‘We’ve heard recently how services for some life-threatening illnesses like cancer have been badly affected by the pandemic. It's important to keep in mind that addiction is also a life-threatening illness, and that it can have a devastating impact on individuals, families and the community.’ 

 

Mr Canning says that while there’s hope of a vaccine being found for COVID, there’s no vaccine for addiction. ‘The New Decade, New Approach programme for government contains a commitment to a new addiction centre in Derry. Now, more than ever, it’s crucial that this is delivered.’

 

He says that in the meantime, anyone who is concerned about their own addiction problem, or someone else’s, should call Northlands on 02871 313232.